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  1. Papa Johns

    Takeaway pizza chain Papa John's released a vegan menu today (28th January 2019) after persistent public demand and a petition with nearly 30,000 signatures urging the brand to offer vegan alternatives.

    The company released not only one vegan option, but three vegan pizza options: 

    • Vegan Sheese and Tomato
    • Garden Party with Sheese 
    • Hot Pepper Passion with Vegan Sheese

    Papa John's have also released their immensely popular marmite and cheese scrolls as now being available as a vegan option. The company has now joined other major fast food outlets such as Pizza Hut, Zizzi and Pizza Express by keeping up with consumer demand for more plant-based foods. Papa John's have made a large step by immediately releasing the vegan options at all of its stores nationwide.

    Managing Director at Papa John's, Liz Williams, has said “we worked closely with PETA who helped us develop the recipes and find the best vegan products, so we expect the new additions will be a huge hit” 

    It seems Ms William’s and others at Papa John's still managed to underestimate the vegan demand, with the new options selling out at many stores! One vegan from Eastbourne called their local store to order the new pizza for him and his wife, but the chain had sold out by lunchtime. They were told ‘they had run out... they had ordered two boxes and had run out already as the demand was so high, but it should be back in on Wednesday.’ 

    There’s a bittersweet feeling among vegans this evening, with everyone enthusiastic about the latest vegan additions selling so well, but many customers still eager to get their hands on one of the new pizzas! 

    Have you tried any of the new vegan options yet? Let us know in the comments below! 

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    Written by Amy Northwood
    Her-Bivore
    My passion for food and conservation has led me to where I am now! My aim is to show people that veganism can be diverse, tasty and adapted to fit every lifestyle and budget! 
    You can find me on Instagram

    Amy Northwood

     
     
  2. Cube of Truth Lower quality

    Vegan Activist Takes on Piers Morgan In New Campaign ‘What Is Piers Defending?’

    Lead vegan advocate Joey Carbstrong has been seen many times on talk shows, news debates, Facebook and YouTube taking part in in-depth debates with some big names, but his recent debates with Piers Morgan have, by far, taken the spotlight as the most intense.

    Piers has been seen many times on Good Morning Britain, a popular British TV show, and can be seen comparing vegans to terrorists in a recent heated debate about dairy. In the same debate, Piers Morgan can also be seen arguing that ‘plants have feelings’ and making personal attacks on Joey’s personal past, an attack which even shocks celebrity chef Antony Worrall Thompson who was appearing on the show to debate against veganism who can be heard in the interview saying, “everybody makes mistakes, he’s changed.” And “Piers leave him alone!”.

    After many similar debates against Piers, Joey has launched a new campaign questioning ‘What is Piers Defending?’. The purpose of this campaign is to draw light to the facts of veganism and challenge the in-depth ideas of exactly what Piers Morgan is arguing for. Joey’s new website WhatIsPiersDefending.com covers aspects of environmental impacts of the meat and dairy industry, the way in which animals are treated and slaughtered, along with information regarding the impact of meat and dairy on health.

    The website features video footage of UK farm practises, displaying the ‘horrific systematic torture abuse and murder’ of animals, along with YouTube videos from fellow activists and a link to the 22-day vegan challenge, with the overall question of ‘What Do You Defend?’

    What do you think about Joey’s new campaign? Get involved in the comment section below!

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  3. Hot Cross Buns

    Hot Cross Buns

    Make the most of your Easter by filling the house with mouth watering smells of mixed spice, bringing together the homely scents of cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger in this (almost) traditional hot cross bun recipe. I’ve tried to keep the recipe as traditional as possible, but of course with a few vegan twists.

    These sticky glazed classics are sure to be a big hit, so despite being a bit time consuming, they’re worth the time and effort to make!

    Total Time: 2 Hours 30 Minutes

    Servings: 12

    Ingredients:

    • 600g strong white flour
    • 2 tbsp ground mixed spice
    • 45g vegan margarine
    • 150g golden caster sugar
    • Zest of 1 unwaxed lemon
    • 2 tsp fast acting yeast
    • 275ml almond milk
    • 125g mixed dried fruit
    • 2 tbsp apple sauce

    For the crosses:

    • 2 tbsp plain flour
    • 2 tbsp cold water
    • golden syrup

    Method:

    1. Sieve your flour into a large bowl, then add your mixed spice and margarine. Using your hands, rub together until it forms fine breadcrumbs. Add your caster sugar, lemon zest and fast acting yeast. Mix together.
    2. Add your apple sauce and almond milk, then combine until all mixed together. Add the dried mixed fruits into the bowl and work in using your hands.
    3. On a floured surface, knead your dough for about 5 minutes, adding more flour as you need to.
    4. Shape your mix into a ball, and lightly grease a clean mixing bowl with a bit of vegan margarine, then plonk your ball of dough in and cover with a clean tea towel. Leave somewhere warm to prove for 1 hour.
    5. After one hour, remove from the bowl and knock back by kneading for one minute, then place back into the bowl and recover with the tea towel. Leave in a warm place to prove for a further 30 minutes.
    6. After this, remove from the bowl and cut your dough in half, then each half into half, then cut each of the 4 sections into three, so you’ll have 12 in total. Shape these into balls and then flatten slightly between the palms of your hands. Place onto baking trays, leaving a small gap between each ball. Cling film loosely but ensuring the edges where the cling film meets the tray is sealed so no air can get in or out. Leave these for a final 30 minutes to prove. Preheat your oven to 230c
    7. Remove the clingfilm and mix your topping flour and water together to form a paste, then pipe the crosses onto the buns with it. Place in the middle of the oven and bake for 10-12 minutes.
    8. When you remove them from the oven, you want to use a pastry brush to spread syrup onto each bun as soon as possible.
    9. Leave to cool for 10 minutes, then transfer onto a cool rack!

     

    These hot cross buns are perfect to enjoy as they are, or when cooled you can cut in half, grill to toast and spread some vegan margarine on them!

    How did it go? Let us know! Share your foodie makes with us in instagram with #HBivore. 

    Follow us on Facebook and like us on Instagram to keep up to date with our latest recipes, news and content!

    Written by Amy Northwood
    Her-Bivore
    My passion for food and conservation has led me to where I am now! My aim is to show people that veganism can be diverse, tasty and adapted to fit every lifestyle and budget! 
    You can find me on Instagram

    Amy Northwood

  4. Hot Cross Buns

    Hot Cross Buns

    Make the most of your Easter by filling the house with mouth watering smells of mixed spice, bringing together the homely scents of cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger in this (almost) traditional hot cross bun recipe. I’ve tried to keep the recipe as traditional as possible, but of course with a few vegan twists.

    These sticky glazed classics are sure to be a big hit, so despite being a bit time consuming, they’re worth the time and effort to make!


     

    Recipe

    Total Time: 2 Hours 30 Minutes

    Servings: 12

    Ingredients:

    • 600g strong white flour
    • 2 tbsp ground mixed spice
    • 45g vegan margarine
    • 150g golden caster sugar
    • Zest of 1 unwaxed lemon
    • 2 tsp fast acting yeast
    • 275ml almond milk
    • 125g mixed dried fruit
    • 2 tbsp apple sauce

    For the crosses:

    • 2 tbsp plain flour
    • 2 tbsp cold water
    • golden syrup

    Method:

    1. Sieve your flour into a large bowl, then add your mixed spice and margarine. Using your hands, rub together until it forms fine breadcrumbs. Add your caster sugar, lemon zest and fast acting yeast. Mix together.

    2. Add your apple sauce and almond milk, then combine until all mixed together. Add the dried mixed fruits into the bowl and work in using your hands.

    3. On a floured surface, knead your dough for about 5 minutes, adding more flour as you need to.

    4. Shape your mix into a ball, and lightly grease a clean mixing bowl with a bit of vegan margarine, then plonk your ball of dough in and cover with a clean tea towel. Leave somewhere warm to prove for 1 hour.

    5. After one hour, remove from the bowl and knock back by kneading for one minute, then place back into the bowl and re-cover with the tea towel. Leave in a warm place to prove for a further 30 minutes.

    6. After this, remove from the bowl and cut your dough in half, then each half into half, then cut each of the 4 sections into three, so you’ll have 12 in total. Shape these into balls and then flatten slightly between the palms of your hands. Place onto baking trays, leaving a small gap between each ball. Cling film loosely but ensuring the edges where the cling film meets the tray are sealed so no air can get in or out. Leave these for a final 30 minutes to prove. Preheat your oven to 230c

    7. Remove the clingfilm and mix your topping flour and water together to form a paste, then pipe the crosses onto the buns with it. Place in the middle of the oven and bake for 10-12 minutes.

    8. When you remove them from the oven, you want to use a pastry brush to spread syrup onto each bun as soon as possible.

    9. Leave to cool for 10 minutes, then transfer onto a cool rack!

     

    These hot cross buns are perfect to enjoy as they are, or when cooled you can cut in half, grill to toast and spread some vegan margarine on them!

    How did it go? Let us know! Share your foodie makes with us in instagram with #HBivore. 

    Follow us on Facebook and like us on Instagram to keep up to date with our latest recipes, news and content!

    Written by Amy Northwood
    Her-Bivore
    My passion for food and conservation has led me to where I am now! My aim is to show people that veganism can be diverse, tasty and adapted to fit every lifestyle and budget! 
    You can find me on Instagram

    Amy Northwood

  5. Tattooed Athlete

    Ah the question so widely asked of vegans on a daily basis. “Where do you get your protein from?”

    Despite such widespread concern for our dietary choices. I’m willing to bet you’ve never heard of a vegan that has died from protein deficiency?

    In addition to the previous point, I would be surprised if you have ever heard of rhinos, gorillas, elephants etc. supplementing their diets with meat for fear of withering away.

    It is possible to obtain all the protein you need to live healthily and happily on a plant-based diet. Here are just a few ways you can hit your protein intake for the day.

    Natural Sources of Protein

    bowl of kale

    Lentils

    Any type of lentil; red, split, green, puy or otherwise is loaded with protein. Per 100g of lentils you can expect to consume around 8-9g of protein. They make for a seriously good curry too!

    Beans

    The staple of the student diet and yet incredibly nutritious. When you crack open your next tin of baked beans, you can expect around 5g of protein. Other types of beans such as pinto, or black-eyed etc are also great and contain around 7-10g of protein per 100g.

    Chickpeas

    Chickpeas are one of my favourites. Mainly because it helps me to justify the amount of hummus I eat. There is 7g of protein per 100g of chickpeas so don’t ever let anyone put you down for your love of hummus.

    Quinoa

    Okay, a bit fancy perhaps but it’s only fancy because of how incredibly healthy it is. While you only get around 4g of protein for every 100g of cooked quinoa. It is a complete protein meaning you get all 22 of the essential amino acids you need in your diet.

    Nuts and seeds

    Nuts and seeds are fantastic. Some make a great standalone snack, others make for a great supplement that you wouldn’t even notice. In a lot of cases, you can expect between 3-5g of protein per tablespoon. One of our particular favourites is Chia Seeds for their range of health benefits. You can even use them as an egg replacement!

    Oats

    Oats are respected as a wonderful carbohydrate to include in your diet, but did you know that per 100g of oats, 10% (10g) of that is protein? What better way to start your day! I usually have a bowl of porridge with almond milk and dried fruits in the morning but there are so many options to try.

    Vegetables

    Yep, vegetables have protein too. Broccoli, Cauliflower, Kale, Spinach as well as many others have between 1.5-2g of protein per 80g but we don’t tend to hear about that! (More on that later).

    Brown and Wild Rice

    per 100g of rice you can expect 4g of protein. If you’re on a budget, rice is perfect for slow release energy, fibre and protein. Making it a favourite among gym goers and meal preppers everywhere.

    Other Sources of Protein

    soy milk

    Seitan

    Seitan is made from gluten, so if you are on a gluten-free diet this certainly doesn’t count. If you’re not, this delicious ingredient is packing 25g of protein per 100g. That’s huge! Not only that, but it’s also a great source of selenium, iron, calcium and phosphorous. (It makes for a great vegan kebab!)

    Tofu

    Made from soybeans and as previously mentioned in this post… beans are great for protein. Again, you can find all the essential amino acids you need in tofu. Typically containing around 10-19g of protein per 100g, you won’t be dying of protein deficiency any time soon. Most complain it’s quite bland - Try drying it out, coating it in cornstarch and adding any mix of flavours to it before frying it off and tell me if you change your mind.

    Nutritional Yeast

    We LOVE nutritional yeast and as the name suggests - it certainly is nutritional. If you get fortified nutritional yeast, there is 14g of protein per ounce, as well as fibre, magnesium, copper, zinc and a whole array of B-Vitamins including vitamin B12 which we covered in an earlier blog post. Did I mention it tastes like cheese?

    Soy Milk

    While plenty of other plant-based milks contain protein too, soy milk really goes the extra mile with 7g of protein per cup. I tend to mix mine with a plant-based protein powder to significantly up my protein intake so there are plenty of options here to hit your goals.

    Why Do We Need Protein?

    Protein is essential in muscle repair and growth. Your skin, hair, muscles and organs all require protein to maintain themselves. Especially if you are exercising.

    The main difference between meat protein and plant-based protein is the type you are consuming. They are divided into two different categories. Complete and incomplete. This is in relation to the amino acids contained in the protein. On a plant-based diet, it is harder to find complete proteins, but as previously mentioned; seitan, tofu, nutritional yeast and other sources do contain all the amino acids you need to sustain yourself.

    So Why Is It Assumed Vegans Don’t Get Enough Protein?

    You may remember, back in the day when you were learning about nutrition, a certain pie chart that depicted what was accepted as a ‘healthy’ diet:

    nutrition chart

    As you can see, the main sources of protein we were educated to believe were healthy consisted of meat, fish and dairy primarily (and nuts in this case).

    The meat and dairy industries hold a lot of sway over how dietary benefits are marketed to us and while they do contain protein, this pie chart also fails to mention the cholesterol and unhealthy fats that come as part of this ‘healthy diet’.

    The fact that we believe that meat and dairy are the only sources of protein available to us is a matter of how they have been marketed. We have grown up believing that they are the only reliable source that will sustain us when this is simply not the case.

     


    I hope this post has highlighted to you that there are more sustainable and healthy ways of reaching your protein intake. As a vegan, I am currently training at the gym and consuming around 140g of protein each day to hit my goals. While I am far from where I aim to be, I have made tenfold the amount of progress than when I was training on a meat diet, mindlessly consuming meat and dairy because that’s where I was told to find my protein.

    Now, I am far more conscious of my eating decisions and am finally starting to reap the benefits of a more healthy and sustainable diet choice.

    there are a number of vegan bodybuilders who have hit their goals and are showcasing that you don’t need meat to get those ‘gains’. You can find inspiration on the Instagram hashtag #veganfitness

    Are you benefitting from a vegan diet? We’d love to hear your stories! Share your journey with us on the hashtag #HBivore

    Follow us on Facebook and like us on Instagram to keep up to date with our latest recipes, news and content!

    Written by Jack Ricketts
    -Him-Bivore
    Marketing has always been my career focus. I am striving to promote a plant-based lifestyle to the masses through positive campaigns and sharing the benefits of veganism. The animals, and the planet, need us more than ever to make a change. 
    You can find me on Instagram